Food Studies Paper (3/8) The Bacon Bomb

THE BACON BOMB!!!

Some foods that have been created are not meant to be made: fried Twinkies, Twinkies, fried butter, and the greatest of them all: The Bacon Bomb.  A combination of bacon, sausage, barbeque sauce and awesomeness.  It is the single greatest food in the history of man, in my opinion.  Creating the wonderful loaf of meaty goodness was the most amazing process ever.  The very simple way to prepare it gives way to a beautiful product.   The warm, succulent flavors and smells were glorious to feel and I wish that I had made more.  Creating the bacon bomb had all of its own unique experience and all of the feelings were different while making it than when it was cooked.

The first thing one notices while making the Bacon Bomb is the feeling.  As I created the amazing meat loaf, I could not help but notice the squishy texture of the raw, fatty, bacon.  As I began the second layer I could felt as though I was picking up soft cookie dough, even though it was actually Jimmy Dean breakfast sausage.  Adding the final layer, I felt a greasy feeling as I layered the bacon chips onto the spread out sausage.  As I rolled the bacon bomb, I could feel the cold meet under my fingers.  The creation of the bacon bomb was one of the greatest parts of my food studies project.

Although not one of the most prominent parts in the creation of the bacon bomb, the smells were still an important part for me.  As I weaved the bacon strips together I could smell the raw meat’s cold aroma.  While adding the barbecue sauce there was a sweet, burnt flavor with the scents of multiple spices.  When I opened the liquid spice seasoning a smoky flavor emanated from it as if it were the essence of a campfire.  The scents of the bacon bomb became more excellent while it was in the oven and while I ate it.

Another of the good qualities of the bacon bomb was its looks.  In the process of creation it consisted of multiple colors.  The light pink color laced with white of the bacon strips and the reddish color of the sausage.  One of the best colors was the deep brown of the barbeque sauce and the way it almost shined as it came out of the bottle.  The rest of the ingredients were mostly a light brown except for a few black peppercorns which I added.  The sight of the bomb changed very dramatically once it was finished cooking.

In the creation process there was not much to taste from the dish, do to it being largely raw, but I did try all of the seasonings.  As I sat at the kitchen table creating my masterpiece I sampled the barbeque sauce and the rib seasoning.  The barbeque sauce very similar to how it smelled a sweet taste with a bit of meaty flavor.  As I tried the rib rub, I noticed a vast amount of salt and pepper, which are two of the main ingredients.  I also tasted a hint of something spicy that made my nose tingle.  Once cooked the bacon bomb tasted infinitely better than its separate ingredients.

The fifth and final sense I used while making the bacon bomb was my hearing.      The first sound that I could hear was the barbeque sauce squirting loudly from its container.  While rolling the wrap of meat, I could hear the squishing and squashing of the meats together.  The most noise filled part of the process was when the bacon bomb was in the oven.  Even while the door on the oven was closed, I could still hear the loud sizzling of the meats as grease and fat spewed forth from it.  Once it was out of the oven it sounded even more delicious.  The loud sizzling continued and the joyous sound of grease and fat splattering onto the cutting board was added.

The second half of my food studies project was eating the bacon bomb once it was finished.  This created a whole different sensory experience.  As I removed my mass of fat and amazingness from the oven I could feel the warmth emanating from it.  As I cut into it, I could feel hot grease and juices splatter onto my hands.  The bacon bomb was obviously not finger food so I ate it with a fork but the next day on the bus, when it was cold and had absorbed all of its juices, I ate more of it.  The texture of the food had changed from a soft, warm, and moist piece of meat to a cold and more firm roll.

Another of the feelings which had changed was the appearance of the dish.  It had transformed from the bland whites and pinks to a light brown on the exterior.  The inside of the dish consisted of multiple layers of color, starting with brown, to deep pink, to extremely dark brown in the center layer.  The colors of the fat on the bacon had even changed from white to a goldenish color.  Even though color was on of the most dramatic changes, taste was by far the greatest.

The smells of the dish had also drastically changed.  The original smell of only barbeque sauce had become mixed with bacon’s salty smell and Jimmy Dean’s maple sausage aroma.  It was a wonderful combination and there was no possible way it could taste bad.  The smells it radiated were incredible and gave a hint to what was to come when I ate it.

The final moments of the project were by far the best.  As I skewered the roll of meat with my fork, juices spilled forth from it.  As it entered my mouth I could feel the warmth of the bacon and taste it before it hit my tongue.  As I bit down I could taste all of the different layers of meat.  From the crunchiness of the outer layer to the succulent inner layer of sausage and then finally into the crispy pieces of bacon on the inside.  The flavor of the barbeque sauce was almost overwhelming due to it being in two separate areas of the bomb, but the rest of the components kept it from tasting only like sauce.  The next day on the bus, I continued eating my masterpiece, even though it was cold.  I think that it actually tasted better cold due to all of the essence being soaked up into the slices of meat.

Even though the bacon bomb tasted good and left a pleasant feeling in my stomach, it left a different kind of emotional mark.  I had eaten the bomb with my family while all of us were together, I had felt so happy at the time to be spending some time with them and not having distractions between us.  It felt nice to just enjoy something together with all of them and not have to worry about anything.

Although this is the first time I have ever eaten the bacon bomb, bacon and Jimmy Dean sausage have been with me for a long time.  Every weekend while at home my dad makes a huge breakfast with everything, including sausage and bacon.  I have many fond memories of eating it with my sister and my parents around the island in the kitchen.

When I ate the bacon bomb I felt full and satisfied.  It was more then I was expecting and could not have left me any happier.  I loved doing this project and creating my food.  Even though I did not want to get up at four-thirty am to have it ready for breakfast, I did and it turned out great.  I cannot wait to make it again for the class and I hope they enjoy it just as much.

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Food Studies Paper (3/8) The Bacon Bomb

  1. Hulking Manatee says:

    I must say, Ben, that we need to make this. With cheese. Adding a nice sharp cheddar to the inside of the Bacon Bomb would only serve to increase the deliciousness, and I cannot wait to devour this with you. The cold slice I had when we returned from vacation was delicious in and of itself, but I would appreciate biting into a hot piece of bacon.

  2. bethanyhartley says:

    I like Logans idea, cheese sounds like it would make this infinitely better. But also, you said “I could still hear the loud sizzling of the meats as grease and fat spewed forth from it.”….What?! that sounds terrible…. and it sounds like greasy goodness.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s